ASABE Announces Standards Projects for Baler Twine, Round-Baler Net

ST JOSEPH, MICHIGAN— The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) has initiated projects to revise the currently published standard ANSI/ASAE S315.3, Twine for Automatic Balers, and to develop a new standard for round -baler net wrap.

The revision to ANSI/ASAE S315.3 will reflect the current increased twine strength for large, square bales and will also include twine for round bales.

The new standard will provide uniform knitted and extruded net wrap nomenclature, along with minimum specifications for round balers, which will ensure satisfactory performance in a properly adjusted round baler.  These specifications will allow the end user to select a net wrap that will provide trouble-free operation and adequate durability during storage and handling of the baled forage or biomass.

Additional input is needed from manufactures of balers, twine and knitted round bale wrap.

Input from knitted net-wrap manufacturers is needed related to the following topics:

1. Tensile strength (minimum values and approved testing methods)

2. UV stability/weatherability (minimum values and approved testing methods)

3. Physical characteristics/dimensions of net rolls

4. Packaging & package signage information

5. Inspection & testing methodologies

Persons interested in participating in the development of these standards may contact ASABE Standards Director Scott Cedarquist, 269-429-0300, [email protected]. A current listing of all ASABE standards projects can be found on the ASABE web site at http://www.asabe.org/standards/proposed.html .

ASABE is recognized worldwide as a standards developing organization for food, agricultural, and biological systems, with more than 225 standards currently in publication. Conformance to ASABE standards is voluntary, except where required by state, provincial, or other governmental requirements, and the documents are developed by consensus in accordance with procedures approved by the American National Standards Institute. For information on this or any other ASABE standard, contact Scott Cedarquist at ASABE, 269-429-0300, [email protected].  A current listing of all ASABE standards projects can be found on the ASABE web site at http://www.asabe.org/standards/proposed.html .

The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers is an educational and scientific organization dedicated to the advancement of engineering applicable to agricultural, food, and biological systems. Founded in 1907 and headquartered in St Joseph, Michigan, ASABE comprises 9,000 members from more than 100 countries. For further information about the Society, or for an electronic copy of this news release, contact Dolores Landeck at ASABE, 269-428-6339, [email protected].